Michael Hayes

Oct 10

mylestanzer:

This is me in my work pod.

mylestanzer:

This is me in my work pod.

(Source: buzzpods)

Oct 08

sportsnetny:

(via Nick Bayiokos)

sportsnetny:

(via Nick Bayiokos)

(via sportsnetny)

Sep 27

[video]

Sep 16

This is how the postponed Nats vs. Braves game is listed on MLB.com.

This is how the postponed Nats vs. Braves game is listed on MLB.com.

Sep 13

Governor Christie Says Jersey Shore Boardwalk Fire "Finished The Job Sandy Started" -

Seaside Park, NJ fire destroys 50 businesses. Gov. Chris Christie says the boardwalk is “gone.”

Sep 11

[video]

Sep 05

explore-blog:

Essential media literacy and wisdom for anyone engaged in the art of communication, which is practically everyone with a beating heart and firing neurons.
jtotheizzoe:

Neil deGrasse Tyson and the Art of the Soundbite
On August 28, the American Museum of Natural History hosted IFLS Live, a panel discussion on the wide, wild world of online science communication from I Fucking Love Science's Elise Andrew, io9's Annalee Newitz, Mitch and Greg from ASAPScience, Emily Graslie of The Brain Scoop and Maria Popova of Brain Pickings (and still the most interesting person on the internet). I’m sure my invitation to the panel got lost in the mail :)
A surprise visitor showed up near the end: none other than Neil deGrasse Tyson, director of AMNH’s Hayden Planetarium. Maria asked him how on Earth (or how on any other planet) he manages to craft such information-rich soundbites, polishing away the jagged edges of the science without dulling its shine. It’s a skill that Tyson has mastered perhaps better than any other living science communicator (incidentally, “science communicator” is a term I am growing to dislike, because it’s very clunky and weird). 
Neil’s full answer is over at Brain Pickings in video form (I highly recommend checking it out in full), but this GIF by Maria captures the tasty essence quite well. I mean, isn’t the GIF really just the soundbite of images?
When you’re done, sit down with your beverage of choice, get comfortable, and take in the full IFLS Live panel (video below):


Aw, thanks Joe!

This GIF is maximum perfection. Maximum. Perfection.

explore-blog:

Essential media literacy and wisdom for anyone engaged in the art of communication, which is practically everyone with a beating heart and firing neurons.

jtotheizzoe:

Neil deGrasse Tyson and the Art of the Soundbite

On August 28, the American Museum of Natural History hosted IFLS Live, a panel discussion on the wide, wild world of online science communication from I Fucking Love Science's Elise Andrew, io9's Annalee Newitz, Mitch and Greg from ASAPScience, Emily Graslie of The Brain Scoop and Maria Popova of Brain Pickings (and still the most interesting person on the internet). I’m sure my invitation to the panel got lost in the mail :)

A surprise visitor showed up near the end: none other than Neil deGrasse Tyson, director of AMNH’s Hayden Planetarium. Maria asked him how on Earth (or how on any other planet) he manages to craft such information-rich soundbites, polishing away the jagged edges of the science without dulling its shine. It’s a skill that Tyson has mastered perhaps better than any other living science communicator (incidentally, “science communicator” is a term I am growing to dislike, because it’s very clunky and weird). 

Neil’s full answer is over at Brain Pickings in video form (I highly recommend checking it out in full), but this GIF by Maria captures the tasty essence quite well. I mean, isn’t the GIF really just the soundbite of images?

When you’re done, sit down with your beverage of choice, get comfortable, and take in the full IFLS Live panel (video below):

Aw, thanks Joe!

This GIF is maximum perfection. Maximum. Perfection.

Wow.
Arizona State Football’s Pat Tillman Tunnel Will Give You Chills

Wow.

Arizona State Football’s Pat Tillman Tunnel Will Give You Chills

Bros.

Bros.

“I never type in the morning. I don’t get up in the morning. I drink at night. I try to stay in bed until twelve o’clock, that’s noon. Usually, if I have to get up earlier, I don’t feel good all day. I look, if it says twelve, then I get up and my day begins. I eat something, and then I usually run right up to the race track after I wake up. I bet the horses, then I come back and Linda cooks something and we talk awhile, we eat, and we have a few drinks, and then I go upstairs with a couple of bottles and I type — starting around nine-thirty and going until one-thirty, to, two-thirty at night. And that’s it.” —

Bukowski

If you’re not Bukowski, you’re doing it wrong.